July Updated Forecast for the 2022 Atlantic Hurricane Season

20 07 2022

Dale C. S. Destin |

My July updated forecast for the 2022 Atlantic Hurricane Season is out, and it continues to call for a very busy and active season with the possibility of being super hyperactive. As of July 20, the forecast is for 19 named storms, 11 hurricanes and 5 major hurricanes. This includes Tropical Storms Alex Bonnie and Colin.

Recall that the accumulated cyclone energy index (ACE) is the universally accepted metric used to classify the overall activity of a hurricane season. The ACE forecast for this year is 193, 41 above the threshold for an active season, based on 1991-2020 data.

A super hyperactive season like 2017 also remains possible. There is a 41 percent chance of the ACE exceeding 223. Further, there is a 50 percent chance of more than 19 named storms; 43 percent chance of more than 11 hurricanes and also a 35 percent chance of more than 6 major hurricanes.

If the forecast pans out, this season would be the most active season since 2017 and the ninth most active, on record, in terms of ACE, dating back to 1851.  

Recall, a typical season, based on the new standard climate period 1991-2020, has 14 named storms, 7 hurricanes and 4 major hurricanes. Major hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of at least 178 km/h or 111 miles per hour (e.g., Category 3 or higher), according to the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

The Atlantic hurricane season officially goes until November 30.

For a more detailed forecast click here.

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June Updated Forecast for the 2022 Atlantic Hurricane Season

20 06 2022

Dale C. S. Destin |

My June updated forecast for the 2022 Atlantic Hurricane Season is out, and it continues to call for a very busy and active season with the potential of being super hyperactive. As of June 20, the forecast is for 20 named storms, 10 hurricanes and 4 major hurricanes.

Recall that the accumulated cyclone energy index (ACE) is the universally accepted metric used to classify the overall activity of a hurricane season. The ACE forecast for this year is 186, 34 above the threshold for an active season, based on 1991-2020 data.

A super hyperactive season like 2017 also remains possible. There is a 37 percent chance of the ACE exceeding 223. Further, there is a 43 percent chance of more than 19 named storms; 24 percent chance of more than 11 hurricanes and also a 22 percent chance of more than 6 major hurricanes.

If the forecast pans out, this season would be the tenth most active, on record, in terms of ACE, dating back to 1851. It would also tie with 1933 for the fourth highest number of named storms.  

Recall, a typical season, based on the new standard climate period 1991-2020, has 14 named storms, 7 hurricanes and 4 major hurricanes. Major hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of at least 178 km/h or 111 miles per hour (e.g., Category 3 or higher), according to the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

The Atlantic hurricane season officially goes until November 30.

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May Updated Forecast for the 2022 Atlantic Hurricane Season

17 05 2022

Dale C. S. Destin |

My May updated forecast for the 2022 Atlantic Hurricane Season is out, and it continues to call for a very busy and active season with the potential of being super hyperactive. As of May 18, the forecast is for 20 named storms (down 1), 9 hurricanes (unchanged) and 4 major hurricanes (unchanged).

Recall that the accumulated cyclone energy index (ACE) is the universally accepted metric used to classify the overall activity of a hurricane season. The ACE forecast for this year is 175, 23 above the threshold for an active season, based on 1991-2020 data.

A super hyperactive season like 2017 also remains possible. There is a 33 percent chance of the ACE exceeding 223. Further, there is a 42 percent chance of more than 19 named storms; 27 percent chance of more than 11 hurricanes and also a 27 percent chance of more than 6 major hurricanes.

If the forecast pans out, this season would be the third most active since 2017, in terms of ACE, and the 16th most active on record dating back to 1851. It would also tie with 1933 for the fourth highest number of named storms.  

The survey of other forecasts reveals a consensus for an above normal season. The consensus is for an ACE of 159, 18 named storms, 9 hurricanes and 4 major hurricanes, a busy and active season. This is generally consistent with my forecast. However, regardless of the forecast, you should always be well prepared each season, as it only takes one hurricane to ruin your year and or life.

The ACE forecast from several models, including that of 268Weather’s for April. The overall average is 159

The main reason for the above normal forecasts is the current La Niña, which is forecast to last through the hurricane season, causing favourable conditions for higher than usual tropical cyclone formation.  

Recall, a typical season, based on the new standard climate period 1991-2020, has 14 named storms, 7 hurricanes and 4 major hurricanes. Major hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of at least 178 km/h or 111 miles per hour (e.g., Category 3 or higher), according to the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

This forecast will be updated monthly around the 14th of each month until August. The first update will be issued around June 14.

The Atlantic hurricane season officially begins on June 1 and concludes on November 30; nevertheless, in the last six years, there have been preseason tropical cyclones–be prepared!

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Early Prediction: Very Busy 2022 Atlantic Hurricane Season Forecast

14 04 2022

Dale C. S. Destin |

This hurricane season will likely be another very busy one, exhausting the primary list of named storms, once again. My early forecast for the 2022 Season is out, and it calls for 21 named storms, 9 hurricanes and 4 major hurricanes.

In addition to being a very busy season, it is most likely to be an active season. Recall that the accumulated cyclone energy index (ACE) is the universally accepted metric used to classify the overall activity of a hurricane season. The ACE forecast for this year is 182, 30 above the threshold for an active season, based on 1991-2020 data.

A super hyperactive season is also possible. There is a 36 percent chance of the ACE exceeding 223. Further, there is a 49 percent chance of more than 19 named storms; 30 percent chance of more than 11 hurricanes and 29 percent chance of more than 6 major hurricanes.

If the forecast pans out, this season would be the third most active since 2017, in terms of ACE, and the tied with 1998 for the 10th most active on record dating back to 1851. It would also tie 2021 for the third highest number of named storms.  

According to other forecasts surveyed, the consensus is for an ACE of 161, 19 named storms, 8 hurricanes and 4 major hurricanes, a busy and active season. This is generally consistent with my forecast but with a notable 21 less ACE. However, regardless of the forecast, you should always be well prepared each season, as it only takes one hurricane to ruin your year and or life.

The main reason for the above normal forecasts is the current La Niña, which should last into the first half of the hurricane season and maintain favourable conditions for tropical cyclone formation even beyond August, into the peak of the hurricane season.

A typical season, based on the new standard climate period 1991-2020, has 14 named storms, 7 hurricanes and 4 major hurricanes. Major hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of at least 178 km/h or 111 miles per hour (e.g., Category 3 or higher), according to the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

The last Atlantic hurricane season–2021, will be most remembered for being a very busy season with 21 named storms. Collectively, the season caused 103 deaths and over US$80 billion in damage. Major Hurricane Ida alone caused 55 deaths and over US$75 billion in damage.

This forecast will be updated monthly around the 14th of each month until August. The first update will be issued around May 14.

The Atlantic hurricane season officially begins on June 1 and concludes on November 30; nevertheless, in the last six years, there have been preseason tropical cyclones–be prepared!

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August Updated Forecast for the 2021 Atlantic Hurricane Season

19 08 2021

Dale C. S. Destin |

The forecast for the 2021 hurricane Season continues to call for an active season with the possibility of it being super-hyperactive. The confidence of an above normal season has remained virtually unchanged at 78%. It is also possible that the season could be super hyperactive or well above normal, with numbers reaching the top 10 percentile 1991-2020 base period or current climate period.

The prediction is now for 22 named storms (subtropical storms, tropical storms and hurricanes), with a 70 percent confidence or high confidence of the number ranging between 17 to 28. It is also likely–69 percent chance, that the number of named storms will exceed 19 and be in the top 10 percentile of the current climate period.

My forecast also calls for an accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index of 188 with a high confidence of the range being 115 to 284. Also predicted are 11 hurricanes with a 70 percent confidence of  the total being 7 to 15, and 5 major hurricanes with high confidence of 3 to 7.

The season could also be well above normal or super hyperactive. There is also a 45% chance of the ACE exceeding 223, the top 10 percentile of the current climate period. Further, there is a massive 69% chance of more than 19 named storms or the number of named storms reaching the top 10 percentile. There is also a 41% chance of more than 11 hurricanes and 45% chance of more than 6 major hurricanes.

If this forecast pans out, this season would be the most active since 2017, in terms of ACE, and the 10th most active on record dating back to 1851. It would also be ranked third for the highest number of named storms, tied for 5th for the most hurricanes and 11th for the most major hurricanes.

If the season turns out to be hyperactive, as is possible, it will rank even higher. Only seven seasons have had a higher ACE than 223; three seasons with more than 19 named storms; four with more than 11 hurricanes and two with more than 6 major hurricanes.

The season initially got off to a “flyer” but became sedate in July. Since the start of August, activity has picked back up, going at a rate of of about one-and-half times the normal season. To date, there have been eight named storms with three becoming hurricanes. A typical season, based on the standard climate period 1991-2020, has 14 named storms, 7 hurricanes and 3 major hurricanes.

The main reason for the above normal forecast is the likely weak La Niña conditions or cold El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) during August to October–the peak of the hurricane season.

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July Updated Forecast for the 2021 Atlantic Hurricane Season

12 07 2021

Dale C. S. Destin |

Category 1 Hurricane Elsa going through the southern Caribbean July 2, 2021.

Not the potentially stressful news anyone wants to hear, but it is what it is; the 2021 hurricane season could challenge the numbers of the 2020 record breaking season. My updated forecast for the Season is out, and it continues to call for an above normal season being pretty much expected. The confidence of an above normal season has increased to 79%. It is also possible that the season could be super hyperactive or well above normal, with numbers reaching the top 10 percentile 1991-2020 base period, which would also be top 8 of all times, dating back to 1851.

The prediction is now for 24 named storms (subtropical storms, tropical storms and hurricanes), with a 70 percent confidence or high confidence of the number ranging between 18 to 31. It is also very likely–74 percent chance (up 18), that the number of named storms will exceed 19 and be in the top 4 seasons of the historical record, dating back to 1851.

My forecast also calls for an accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index of 191 (up 5) with a high confidence of the range being 119 to 288. Also predicted are 10 hurricanes (up 1) with a 70 percent confidence of  the total being 7 to 14, and 5 major hurricanes (unchanged) with high confidence of 3 to 7.

The season could not only be above normal but well above normal or super hyperactive. There is also a 45% chance of the ACE exceeding 223, the top 10 percentile of the 1991-2020 base period. Further, there is a massive 74% chance of more than 19 named storms or the number of named storms reaching the top 10 percentile. There is also a 45% chance of more than 11 hurricanes and 44% chance of more than 6 major hurricanes.

If this forecast pans out, this season would be the most active since 2017, in terms of ACE, and the 10th most active on record dating back to 1851. It would also be ranked third for the highest number of named storms and tied for 9th for the most hurricanes and major hurricanes respectively.

If the season turns out to be hyperactive, as is possible, it will rank even higher. Only seven seasons have had a higher ACE than 223; three seasons with more than 19 named storms; four with more than 11 hurricanes and two with more than 6 major hurricanes.

Already, the season is off to a “flyer”. Already, there has been five named storms (close to four times the average to date) and one hurricane (close to three times the average to date) . The ACE to date is 12.8. In other words, year-to-date, there is normally 1-2 names storms, instead of 5; 1 hurricane every three years and ACE of 4, as opposed to 12.8, which is over three times the normal rate, up to this point in the season.

The main reasons for the above normal forecasts are the likely above normal sea surface temperatures across the tropical North Atlantic Ocean and a weak La Niña conditions and or a cold-neutral El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) during August to October–the peak of the hurricane season.

A typical season, based on the standard climate period 1991-2020, has 14 named storms, 7 hurricanes and 3 major hurricanes. Major hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of at least 178 km/h or 111 miles per hour (e.g., Category 3 or higher), according to the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

This forecast is updated monthly around the 15th each month until August. The next update will be issued around August 15. Note that these forecasts are to be taken as guides and not as gospel.

The Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1 and will conclude on November 30. Be prepared! Please share this blog, if you found it useful and follow me for more on the ongoing hurricane season, which, god forbid, could be another wild one like last year; also follow for all things weather and climate – TwitterFacebook and Instagram.





June Updated Forecast for the 2021 Atlantic Hurricane Season

19 06 2021

Dale C. S. Destin |

The numbers for this hurricane season are likely to be very high once again. My updated forecast for the 2021 season is out, and it continues to call for an above normal season being likely. The confidence of an above normal season has grown from 69 to 78%. It is also possible that the season could be super hyperactive with more than 19 named storms likely.

The prediction is still for 22 named storms (tropical storms and hurricanes), with a 70 percent confidence or high confidence of the number ranging between 17 to 28. It is also likely–56 percent chance (down 2), that the number of named storms will exceed 19 and be in the top 10 percentile of the historical record, dating back to 1851.

My forecast also calls for an accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index of 186 (up 7) with a high confidence of the range being 112 to 286. There is also a 44 percent chance (up 9) of the ACE index exceeding 223. Also predicted are 9 hurricanes (down 1) with a 70 percent confidence of  the total being 6 to 13, and 5 major hurricanes (up 1) with high confidence of 2 to 7.

If this forecast pans out, this season would be the most active since 2017, in terms of ACE, and the 10th most active on record dating back to 1851. It would also be ranked third for the highest number of named storms and tied for 11th and 17th for the most hurricanes and major hurricanes respectively.

The main reasons for the above normal forecasts are the likely above normal sea surface temperatures across the tropical North Atlantic and a weak La Niño and or cold-neutral El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) during August to October–the peak of the hurricane season.

A typical season, based on the standard climate period 1991-2020, has 14 named storms, 7 hurricanes and 3 major hurricanes. Major hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of at least 178 km/h or 111 miles per hour (e.g., Category 3 or higher), according to the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

This forecast is updated monthly around the 15th each month until August. The next update will be issued around July 15.

The Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1 and will conclude on November 30. Be prepared! Please share this blog, if you found it useful and follow me for more on the ongoing hurricane season, which unfortunately could be another wild one, and for all things weather and climate – TwitterFacebook and Instagram.





May Updated Forecast for the 2021 Atlantic Hurricane Season

12 05 2021

Dale C. S. Destin |

The numbers for this Atlantic hurricane season could challenge those of the record breaking 2020 Season. My updated forecast for the 2021 Season is out, and it continues to call for an above normal season being likely. It is also possible that the season could be super hyperactive.

The prediction is for 22 named storms (tropical storms and hurricanes), with a 70 confidence or high confidence of the number ranging between 15 to 29. It is also likely–58 percent chance, that the number of named storms will exceed 19 and be in the top 10 percentile of the historical record, dating back to 1851.

My forecast also calls for an accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index of 179 (down 5) with a high confidence of the range being 89 to 266. There is also a 35 percent chance chance of the ACE index exceeding 223, super hyperactive or in the top 10 percentile of the 1991-2020 climatology. Also predicted are 10 hurricanes (up 1) with a 70 percent confidence of  the total being 6 to 14, and 4 major hurricanes (down 1) with high confidence of 2 to 7.

If this forecast pans out, this season would be the third most active since 2005, in terms of ACE, and the 14th most active on record dating back to 1851. It would also be ranked third for the highest number of named storms and tied for 9th and 19th for the most hurricanes and major hurricanes respectively. Further, the season would be deemed extremely active (hyperactive) according to the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) criteria i.e. ACE greater than 159.6.

According to other forecasts surveyed, the consensus is for an ACE of 152, 18 named storms, 8 hurricanes and 4 major hurricanes – an above normal season. This is generally consistent with my forecast but with a notable 18 percent less activity (ACE); notwithstanding, I am very confident in the 268Weather forecast. Nevertheless, regardless of the forecast, you should always prepare the same each season, as it only takes one hurricane to ruin your year and or life.

The 2020 hurricane season had a record 30 named storms, 14 hurricanes and a record tying 7 major hurricanes. There was also an ACE index of 185. Overall, the 2020 season is ranked 10th, based on ACE. The most active season, since record began in 1851, remains 1933, with an ACE of 259. Note, based on post-analysis, Tropical Storm Gamma was upgraded to a Category 1 hurricane on 17 April 2021 and Category 2 Hurricane Zeta was upgraded to Category 3 on 10 May 2021.

The main reasons for the above normal forecasts are the likely above normal sea surface temperatures across the tropical North Atlantic and a weak La Niño and or cold-neutral El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) during August to October–the peak of the hurricane season.

A typical season, based on the standard climate period 1991-2020, has 14 named storms, 7 hurricanes and 3 major hurricanes. Major hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of at least 178 km/h or 111 miles per hour (e.g., Category 3 or higher), according to the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

This forecast will be updated monthly around the 10th each month until August. The next update will be issued around June 10.

The Atlantic hurricane season officially begins on June 1 and concludes on November 30; nevertheless, in the last five years, there have been preseason tropical cyclones–be prepared early!

Please share this blog, if you found it useful and follow me for more on the upcoming hurricane season, which unfortunately could be a repeat of last year, for and all things weather and climate – TwitterFacebook and Instagram.





2021 Atlantic Hurricane Season Early Forecast

12 04 2021

Dale C. S. Destin |

We could have a repeat of the record breaking 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season this year. My early forecast for the 2021 Season is out, and it calls for above normal activity being likely. It predicts the most likely number of named storms (tropical storms and hurricanes) to be 21; however, there is a 70 percent or high confidence of the number ranging between 17 to 30. Recall that we had an unprecedented 30 named storms last year.

My forecast also calls for an accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index of 184 with a high confidence of the range being 109 to 275. The ACE for the 2020 Season was 185; just one more than is forecast for this year. Also predicted are nine hurricanes with a 70 percent confidence of  the total being 6 to 14 and 5 major hurricanes with high likelihood of a range of 2 to 7.

If this forecast pans out, this season would be the third most active since 2005, in terms of ACE, and the 11th most active in the series dating back to 1851. It would also be ranked third for the highest number of named storms and tied for 11th and 17th for the most major hurricanes and hurricanes respectively.  

According to other forecasts surveyed, the average is for an ACE of 151, 18 named storms, 9 hurricanes and 4 major hurricanes, an above normal season. This is generally consistent with my forecast but with a notable 22 percent less activity (ACE). Notwithstanding, I am very confident in the forecast; last year, my forecast consistently called for more storms than virtually all else and was the only one that indicated that the 2005 record could be broken and that we could get 30 or more named storms. However, regardless of the forecast, you should always prepare the same each season, as it only takes one hurricane to ruin your year and or life.

Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) based on 6 forecasting entities.

Recall that the ACE is the universally accepted metric used to classify the overall activity of a hurricane season. It takes not only the number of named storms into consideration but also their intensities and duration. For example, the 2020 season had a record 30 named storms, eclipsing the record of 28 set in 2005; despite this, the ACE of 185, ranked it as the 10th most active season, eight spots behind 2005, which had an ACE of 250 and nine spots behind 1933–the record most active season with an ACE of 259. With respect to some other notable records, 2005 still holds the record for the most hurricanes with 15, and remains tied with 1961 for the highest number of major hurricanes–7.

The main reasons for the above normal forecasts are the likely above normal sea surface temperatures across the tropical North Atlantic and a cold-neutral El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) during August to October–the peak of the hurricane season.

A typical season, based on the standard climate period 1981-2010, has 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes and 3 major hurricanes. Major hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of at least 178 km/h or 111 miles per hour (e.g., Category 3 or higher), according to the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. The last Atlantic hurricane season–2020, will be most remembered for the record 30 named storms with Major Hurricanes Laura, Delta, Eta and Iota. Collectively, they accounted for over 300 of the over 400 deaths from tropical cyclones and caused over US$32 billion of the US$51 billion in damage. The season also produced 13 hurricanes and 6 became major hurricanes.

Satellite images for all 30 named storms from the 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season. Credit WMO

This forecast will be updated monthly around the 10th of each month until August. The first update will be issued around May 10.

The Atlantic hurricane season officially begins on June 1 and concludes on November 30; nevertheless, in the last five years, there have been preseason tropical cyclones–be prepared!

Please share this blog, if you found it useful and follow me for more on the upcoming hurricane season, which unfortunately could be a repeat of last year, for and all things weather and climate – TwitterFacebook and Instagram.





Updated Hurricane Season Forecast – August Look Out You Must, 2020

12 08 2020

Dale C. S. Destin |

My “August look out you must” updated forecast for the 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season is out, and it continues to call for an above normal season, which is likely to be very active/hyperactive – well above normal.

My forecast calls for 26 named storms (up 3), including ArthurBerthaCristobal, Dolly, Edouard, Fay, Gonzalo, Hanna and Isaias, with 10 becoming hurricanes (up 1) and 4 becoming major hurricanes (down 1). The accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index is forecast to be 218 (up 18). Further, there is a 70% confidence of

  • 20 to 32 named storms;
  • 7 to 15 becoming hurricanes;
  • 3 to 7 becoming major hurricanes and
  • 141 to 305 ACE.

If the forecast materializes, the ACE would be top 8 of all times. And if we use the ACE as an indicator of destructive potential, as some do, it means that the season’s destructive potential would also be top 8 of all times.

To date, the season has produced an ACE of 23.1, more than twice the usual amount for January through July. A normal season produces 106 ACE. Also, there have been nine named storms to date, two of which became hurricanes – over five time the average number of hurricanes of 1.9 and four times the usual number of hurricanes of 0.2. So, it has been a record busy season. Never before in history have we seen this many Atlantic tropical storms this early in the year.

If the forecast materializes, the ACE would be top 8 of all times. And if we use the ACE as an indicator of destructive potential, as some do, it means that the season’s destructive potential would also be top 8 of all times.

To date, the season has produced an ACE of 23.1, more than twice the usual amount for January through July. A normal season produces 106 ACE. Also, there have been nine named storms to date, two of which became hurricanes – over five time the average number of hurricanes of 1.9 and four times the usual number of hurricanes of 0.2. So, it has been a record busy season. Never before in history have we seen this many Atlantic tropical storms this early in the year.

The main reasons for the above normal forecast are the continuation of a much warmer than usual tropical North Atlantic (TNA) and a developing La Niña.

Tropical North Atlantic (TNA) Index – Reds for warmer than usual and blues for the opposite.
Pacific Ocean Niño3.4 – Reds for warmer than usual and blues for the opposite

The greater the likelihood of these two things happening at the same time – August to October, the greater the chances for an above normal season.

There is one thing that may mitigate these developing near perfect conditions for tropical cyclone formation – more than usual Saharan Dust, streaming across the area. If this were to continue, the forecast numbers would be lower. Unfortunately, we have no skill in forecasting the dust beyond a week; hence, we do not know if the dust will continue beyond August and deep into the peak of the months – August to October.

Compared to my forecast, most other forecasts continue to call for an above normal season. However, compared with most other forecasts, my forecast is calling for a much more active season – 34% more, on average.

Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) based on 15 forecasting entities, including 268Weather.

Clearly, we have no control over the numbers for the season. But notwithstanding the forecast, you should always prepare the same each season, as it only takes one hurricane to ruin your year and or life.

This is my last forecast for this hurricane season. My first forecast for the 2021 season will be available around April 10. All the best for the rest of this 2020 season.

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Updated Hurricane Season Forecast – July Stand By 2020

13 07 2020

Dale C. S. Destin|

My “July stand by” updated forecast for the 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season is out, and it continues to call for an above normal season, which is likely to be hyperactive – well above normal.

My forecast calls for 23 named storms (up 2), including Arthur, Bertha, Cristobal and Dolly, with 9 becoming hurricanes (unchanged) and 5 becoming major hurricanes (unchanged). The accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index is forecast to be 200 (down 2). Further, there is a 70% confidence of

  • 17 to 28 named storms;
  • 6 to 13 becoming hurricanes;
  • 3 to 7 becoming major hurricanes and
  • 122 to 283 ACE.

If the forecast materialises, the ACE would be top 10 of all times. And if we use the ACE as an indicator of destructive potential, as some do, it means that the season’s destructive potential would also be top 10 of all times.

To date, the season has produced an ACE of 7.8, twice the usual amount for January through July 13. A normal season produces 106 ACE. Also, there have been six named storms to date, five time the average of 1.2. So, it has been a record busy season. Never before in history have we seen this many Atlantic tropical storms this early in the year.

The main reasons for the above normal forecast are:

  1. the continuation of a warmer than usual tropical North Atlantic (TNA) and
  2. a developing La Niña.

The greater the likelihood of these two things happening at the same time – August to October, the greater the chances for an above normal season.

There is one thing that may mitigate these developing near perfect conditions for tropical cyclone formation – more than usual Saharan Dust, streaming across the area. If this were to continue, the forecast numbers would be lower. Unfortunately, we have no skill in forecasting the dust beyond a week; hence, we do not know if the dust will continue beyond July and into the peak of the season – August to October.

Compared to my forecast, most other forecasts continue to call for an above normal season. However, compared with most other forecasts, my forecast is calling for a much more active season – 32% more, on average.

Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) based on 15 forecasting entities, including 268Weather.

Clearly, we have no control over the numbers for the season. But notwithstanding the forecast, you should always prepare the same each season, as it only takes one hurricane to ruin your year and or life.

Please share this blog, if you found it useful and follow me for more on the upcoming hurricane season and all things weather and climate – TwitterFacebook and Instagram.





Updated Hurricane Season Forecast – June Too Soon 2020

10 06 2020

Dale C. S. Destin|

My “June too soon” updated forecast for the 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season is out, and it continues to call for an above normal season, which is likely to be hyperactive – well above normal.

The forecast predicts an accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index of 202 (up 13 over the previous forecast), 21 named storms (up 2 to include Arthur and Bertha), 9 hurricanes (unchanged) and 5 major hurricanes (up 1).

To give a clearer picture of the forecast and the uncertianties, there is a 70% confidence of

  • 17 to 26 named storms;
  • 6 to 13 becoming hurricanes;
  • 2 to 7 becoming major hurricanes – Category 3 and higher and
  • 122 to 289 ACE.

If the forecast materialises, the ACE would be top 10 of all times. And if we use the ACE as an indicator of destructive potential, as some do, it means that the season’s destructive potential would also be top 10 of all times.

The main reasons for the above normal forecast are:

  1. the likely continuation of a warmer than usual tropical North Atlantic (TNA) and
  2. the potential for a cooler than normal eastern equatorial Pacific i.e. La Niña.

The greater the likelihood of these two things happening at the same time – August to October , the greater the chances for an above normal season.

TNA Index – very positive since about February 2020, indicative of warmer than usual sea surface temperatures across the region

According to other forecasts surveyed, the consensus is for an ACE of 151 (up 5), 17 named storms (unchanged), 9 hurricanes (up 1) and 4 major hurricanes (unchanged). These numbers represent an above normal season.

Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) based on 15 forecasting entities, including 268Weather.

Compared to my forecast, most other forecasts are also calling for an above normal season. However, compared with most other forecasts, my forecast is calling for a much more active season – 34% more.

Clearly, we have no control over the numbers for the season. But notwithstanding the forecast, you should always prepare the same each season, as it only takes one hurricane to ruin your year and or life.

Please share this blog, if you found it useful and follow me for more on the upcoming hurricane season and all things weather and climate – TwitterFacebook and Instagram.





May 2020 Updated Hurricane Season Forecast: Hyperactive Season Likely

11 05 2020

Dale C. S. Destin |

Our updated forecast for the 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season is out, and it calls for higher than normal activity – an above normal season. The forecast predicts an accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index of 189 (down 6 from the previous forecast), 19 named storms (down 1), 9 hurricanes (unchanged) and 4 major hurricanes (down 1). With these numbers, it is also likely that the season will be hyperactive i.e. well above normal and possibly unusually destructive.

If this forecast, for which there is very high confidence, pans out, this season would be the most active since 2017, in terms of ACE, and the 10th most active on record dating back to 1851.

The season also has the potential to be record breaking in some areas, as there is 70 percent confidence of

  • 14 to 23 named storms;
  • 6 to 12 becoming hurricanes;
  • 2 to 7 becoming major hurricanes and
  • 112 to 276 ACE.

If the higher end of the ranges were to materialise, records would be equalled or broken for the number of major hurricanes and more importantly ACE, which is the universally accepted metric used to classify the overall activity of a hurricane season.

According to other forecasts surveyed, the consensus is for an ACE of 146 (down 3), 17 named storms (up 1), 8 hurricanes (unchanged) and 4 major hurricanes (unchanged) – above normal season. This is generally consistent with my forecast but with less activity. However, regardless of the forecast, you should always prepare the same each season, as it only takes one hurricane to ruin your year and or life.

Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) based on 10 forecasting entities, including 268Weather.

The main reasons for the above normal forecasts are the likely above normal sea surface temperatures across the tropical North Atlantic and a cold-neutral El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) or a weak cold ENSO, i.e. weak La Niña, during the peak of the hurricane season – August to October.

A typical season has 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes. Major hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of at least 178 km/h or 111 miles per hour (e.g., Category 3 or higher), according to the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

Click for pronounciations

With respect to records, the 2005 season has the highest number of named storms and hurricanes – 28 and 15 respectively. The 2005 season also tied with the 1961 season for the highest number of major hurricanes – 7, and the season with the highest ACE – the most active season on record, based on ACE only, is 1933 with 259.

The last Atlantic hurricane season – 2019, was more active than normal and will long be remembered for Super Category 5 Hurricane Dorian’s destruction of the northwest Bahamas. The season had 18 named storms, 6 became hurricanes – winds of at least 119 km/h or 74 miles per hour, and 3 became major hurricanes.

This forecast will be updated monthly until August. The next update will be issued around June 10.

The Atlantic hurricane season begins in days – June 1 and concludes on November 30, be prepared!

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2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season Early Forecast

10 04 2020

Dale C. S. Destin |

My early forecast for the 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season is out and it calls for above normal activity being likely. It calls for an accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index of 195, 20 named storms, 9 hurricanes and 5 major hurricanes. With these numbers, it is also likely to be a hyperactive and unusually destructive season.

2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season Forecast

If this forecast pans out, this season would be the most active since 2017, in terms of ACE, and the 10th most active on record dating back to 1851. It would also be the ranked 10th highest season for the number of major hurricanes, 16th for hurricanes and 2nd for named storms.

The season also has the potential to be record breaking, as there is 70 percent confidence of

  • 14 to 25 named storms;
  • 6 to 12 becoming hurricanes;
  • 3 to 8 becoming major hurricanes and
  • 105 to 285 ACE.

If the higher end of the ranges were to materialise, records would be equalled or broken for the number of major hurricanes and more importantly ACE, which is the universally accepted metric used to classify the overall activity of a hurricane season.

According to other forecasts surveyed, the consensus is for an ACE of 149, 16 named storms, 8 hurricanes and 4 major hurricanes – above normal season. This is generally consistent with my forecast but with less activity. However, regardless of the forecast, you should always prepare the same each season, as it only takes one hurricane to ruin your year and or life.

The main reasons for the above normal forecasts are the likely above normal sea surface temperatures across the tropical North Atlantic and a cold-neutral El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) or a weak cold ENSO, i.e. weak La Niña, during the peak of the hurricane season – August to October.

A typical season has 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes. Major hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of at least 178 km/h or 111 miles per hour (e.g., Category 3 or higher), according to the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

With respect to records, the 2005 season has the highest number of named storms and hurricanes – 28 and 15 respectively. The 2005 season also tied with the 1961 season for the highest number of major hurricanes – 7, and the season with the highest ACE – the most active season on record, based on ACE only, is 1933 with 259.

The last Atlantic hurricane season – 2019, was more active than normal and will long be remembered for Super Category 5 Hurricane Dorian’s destruction of the northwest Bahamas. The season had 18 named storms, 6 became hurricanes – winds of at least 119 km/h or 74 miles per hour, and 3 became major hurricanes.

This forecast will be updated monthly until August. The first update will be issued around May 10.

The Atlantic hurricane season begins on June 1 and concludes on November 30 – be prepared!

Please share this blog, if you found it useful and follow me for more on the upcoming hurricane season and all things weather and climate – TwitterFacebook and Instagram.





July’s Update: 2019 Atlantic Hurricane Season Forecast

15 07 2019

Dale C. S. Destin |

My updated forecast for the 2019 Atlantic Hurricane Season is out and it continues to call for above normal activity (an active season) being likely. The probability of this happening is up from the previous forecast from 45% to 54%. Thus, I am more confident of an above normal season.

It calls for an accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index of 127 (up 13), 13 named storms, 6 hurricanes and 3 major hurricanes.

Forecast parameters with 70 percent confidence intervals in (parentheses), right

A typical season has 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes. Major hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of at least 178 km/h or 111 miles per hour (e.g., Category 3 or higher), according to the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

According to other forecasts surveyed, the consensus is for an ACE of 112, 13 named storms, 7 hurricanes and 3 major hurricanes – above to near normal season. Thus, my forecast is calling for more activity.  However, regardless of the forecast, you should always prepare the same each season, as it only takes one hurricane to ruin your year and or life.

The Atlantic hurricane season began on June 1 and will conclude November 30.

The next update will be issued around August 10.

Please share this blog, if you found it useful and follow me for more on the upcoming hurricane season and all things weather and climate – TwitterFacebook and Instagram.





Updated Hurricane Season Forecast: Near Normal Season Most Likely

12 08 2018

Dale C. S. Destin |

Good news! Our August updated forecast for the 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season is now available and it is indicating that a near normal season is most likely this year. The prediction is for an accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index of 93, 11 named storms, 5 becoming hurricanes and 2 becoming major hurricanes.

Aug2016HSOutlookCorrected

Recall that a typical season has an ACE index of 106, 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes. Major hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of at least 178 km/h or 111 miles per hour (e.g., Category 3 or higher), based on the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

Recall also that the ACE is the overall predictor of a hurricane season, it is a measure that represent the total number of storms, their intensities and durations.

According to other forecasts surveyed, the latest consensus is for an ACE of 88, 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes and 2 major hurricanes. Thus, our forecast is calling for similar activity; however, regardless of the forecast, you should always prepare well each season, as it only takes one hurricane to ruin your year.

The Atlantic hurricane season started June 1 and will continue until November 30.

If you found this article informative, I would be very grateful if you would help it spread by emailing it to a friend or sharing it on Twitter or Facebook.

Follow us for all you need to know about the upcoming hurricane season and all things weather and climate. Follow us on twitterfacebookinstagramtumblrflickrgoogle+, and youtube. Thank you!





Updated Hurricane Season Forecast: Near to Above Normal Season is Now Likely

17 07 2018

Dale C. S. Destin |

Good news and bad news: Our July updated forecast for the 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season is now available and it indicates that the hurricane season will likely be near to above normal. The prediction is for an accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index of 99, 12 named storms, 5 becoming hurricanes and 3 becoming major hurricanes.

Jul2018HurricaneSeasonOutlook

The good news is that there is a 37 percent chance of there being a near normal season. The bad news is that there is also a 37 percent chance of there being an above normal/active season; hence, the near to above normal forecast for the season.

Recall that during a near normal season, there is a 33% chance of a named storm (tropical storm or hurricane) affecting, i.e. passing within 120 miles of Antigua and Barbuda. By comparison, during an above normal season, the chance soars to 75%.

With respect to hurricanes, the chance of us being affected during a near normal season – 18 percent, more than triples – 59 percent, for an above normal/active season. Further, we have never had a major hurricane during a near normal season. Clearly, an active season is least prefered.

Chance of Anu Being Affected By TS

These new numbers represent a marginal increase above those of the previous forecast. Previously, the forecast called for an ACE of 93, 11 named storms, 5 hurricanes and 2 major hurricanes. If the season turns out to be near normal, it would be due mainly to cooler than normal sea surface temperatures, across the tropical North Atlantic. If it turns out to be active, it would be mainly due to the absence or late development of El Nino.

Recall that the ACE is the overall predictor of a hurricane season, it is a measure that represent the total number of storms, their intensities and durations.

A typical season has an ACE index of 106, 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes. Major hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of at least 178 km/h or 111 miles per hour (e.g., Category 3 or higher), based on the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

If this forecast pans out, 2018 would be the least active since 2015. Notwithstanding, a season with activity second only to 2017, since 2005, cannot be ruled out.

According to other forecasts surveyed, the latest consensus is for an ACE of 89, 12 named storms, 5 hurricanes and 2 major hurricanes. Thus, our forecast is calling for slightly higher activity; however, regardless of the forecast, you should always prepare well each season, as it only takes one hurricane to ruin your year.

The Atlantic hurricane season started June 1 and will continue until November 30.

We will be updating this forecast by August 10.

If you found this article informative, I would be very grateful if you would help it spread by emailing it to a friend, or sharing it on Twitter or Facebook.

Follow us for all you need to know about the upcoming hurricane season and all things weather and climate. Follow us on twitterfacebookinstagramtumblrflickrgoogle+, and youtube. Thank you!





Early Forecasts for 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season

11 04 2018

Dale C. S. Destin|

Our early season forecast for the 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season calls for above normal activity. The prediction is for an accumulated energy (ACE) index of 135, 15 named storms, 7 hurricanes and 4 major hurricanes.

Apr2018HurrucaneSeasonForecast

A typical season has 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes. Major hurricanes have sustained wind speeds of at least 178 km/h or 111 miles per hour (e.g., Category 3 or higher), based on the Saffir Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season was one of the most destructive for the Caribbean; several islands were almost totalled. Barbuda, one half of the twin island state of Antigua and Barbuda was left uninhabitable for a while. Ten of last year’s 17 named storms reached hurricane strength—meaning they had sustained winds of at least 119 km/h or 74 miles per hour—and six of the 10 hurricanes were major ones.

If this forecast pans out, 2018 would be the second most active since 2010; second to last year’s season.

The Atlantic hurricane season begins on June 1 and concludes on November 30.

We will be updating our 2018 forecast by June 10.

According to other forecasts surveyed, the consensus is for an ACE of 105, 14 named storms, 6 hurricanes and 3 major hurricanes. Thus, our forecast is generally calling for higher activity than most; however, regardless of the forecast, you should always prepare well each season, as it only takes one hurricane to ruin your year.

Follow us for all you need to know about the upcoming hurricane season and all things weather and climate. We can be followed on  twitterfacebookinstagramtumblrflickrgoogle+, and youtube.





August 2016 to January 2017 Climate Outlooks for Antigua and Barbuda

16 08 2016

Dale C.S. Destin |

The August 2016 to January 2017 climate outlooks are now available for Antigua and Barbuda. Over the short, medium and long-term the rainfall is likely to be above to near normal.  Thus, there is a moderate chance of, at least, a temporary end to some droughts over the upcoming six months. Meanwhile, uncomfortably warm temperatures are expected for the upcoming six months. August-October (ASO) is the most active part of the hurricane season and is likely to be the most active since 2012.

Drought

July 2016 was wetter than the last three Julys and wetter than the last two combined; however, it was not wet enough to end the droughts (meteorological, agricultural, hydrological and socioeconomic). We have now entered the 38th month of mostly moderate or worse rainfall deficits; however, since April, the meteorological and agricultural droughts have been at slight levels.

May-Oct2016 Rainfall Outlook

Looking forward – the meteorological and agricultural droughts could ease further or perhaps come to, at least, a temporary end as August has a 60% chance of being wetter than usual, and there is a 40% chance of the ASO period getting above normal rainfall. Over the long run, above  to near normal rainfall is likely. Notwithstanding, drought warnings and watches are in effect for various periods through January 2017.

The warm phase of El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) – El Nino, came to an end in May leaving in its wake significant adverse impacts. There is now around a 60% chance of the cold phase of ENSO i.e. La Nina developing during the last third of the year or the latter half of our wet season. A few months, ago the chance of La Nina was in excess of 75%, so its chance of develop is on the decline; nevertheless, it is still more likely than not.

If you are in our part of the world – the Caribbean, a La Nina would be more than welcome. Unlike El Nino, La Nina often brings us more than usual rainfall, and with the record drought we are still experiencing, water is more precious than gold at the moment.

Unlikely, but a much wetter than normal wet season (July-December) is desperately needed to end our severe multi-year droughts.

Precipitation and temperature

Year-to-date, Antigua, on average, has had more than twice the amount of rainfall than for the same period last year. Nevertheless, we are still over 100 mm (four inches) in the “red” relative to the long-term average of 534.9 mm (21.06 in).

This up-tick in rainfall is likely to generally continue over the long-term – August 2016 to January 2017, there is a 75% probability of above to near normal rainfall. However, the projected rainfall for 2016 is 657 to 1218.5 mm (25.9-48.0 in) or below to near normal.

The summer heat is likely to continue through October with the ASO “season” likely to be warmer than usual. With a high confidence of warmer than usual weather, there is also the potential for extreme temperatures. The heat could be very distressing for many especially since both night-time and day-time temperatures are likely to be higher than usual. High than usual night-time temperatures are likely to continue through January 2017. This has negative implications for health, especially among older adults, infants and young children.

The hurricane season

Thus far for the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season, there have been five named storms and two hurricanes (Alex and Earl). The number of storms is considered above normal relative to the long-term average of three. However, the ACE, which matters most, is near normal.

Recently issued hurricane season forecasts have reasserted that the 2016 season is likely to be the most active since 2012. Notwithstanding, the forecast is for the season to fall in the near normal range with around 15 named storms, 7 becoming hurricanes and 3 major hurricanes; this includes those already formed.

Notwithstanding the forecast, we need to be fully prepared, as it only takes one hurricane to set our life and community back by decades. Be prudent: prepare for the worst and hope for the best!

See the following links for the full outlooks: August 2016, August-October 2016, November 2016-January 2017, August 2016-January 2017, Drought, 2016 Updated Hurricane Season Forecast.

The next set of outlooks will be available by September 3, 2016.

Correction, August 19, 2016: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated the rainfall forecast for August 2016 to January 2017. The forecast is for above to near normal rainfall rather than below to near normal.





The Most Active Atlantic Hurricane Season in Four Years Remains Likely

15 08 2016

Dale C. S. Destin |

The latest round of forecasts has reaffirmed that the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season is likely to be the most active since 2012. However, notwithstanding the predicted increase in activity over recent years, the forecast continues to call for a near normal 2016 hurricane season.

Ensemble forecast

Our ensemble (mean) forecast calls for 15 named storms with 7 becoming hurricanes and 3 reaching major hurricane status. This represents a slight difference from the previous forecast, which called for one less named storm but one more major hurricane.

Updated Hurricane Season Forecast

In meteorological community, the accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index is deemed the best “yard-stick” to measure the activity of a hurricane season. The ACE index is a measurement of the strength and duration of a named storm. Summing together the ACE of each named storm, provides a more comprehensive picture of the activity of a season, aside from just the number of storms.

This year, our ensemble forecast calls for an ACE index of 102. This is seven less than the previous forecast ACE but still well within the near normal range. If this forecast pans out, the 2016 season would be around 183%, 52% and 62% more active than 2013, 2014 and 2015 respectively.

The ensemble (mean) forecast is based on predictions from seven organizations: Klotzbach of Colorado State University, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Saunders and Lea of Tropical Storm Risk.com (TSR), the Integrated Forecast System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), Weather Channel, the Institute for Meteorology (INSMET) of Cuba and Truchelut of WeatherTiger.

The season so far

So far, there have been five named storms: Hurricanes Alex and Earl and Tropical Storms Bonnie, Collin and Danielle. None impacted Antigua and Barbuda, but the disturbance that became Earl brought us some welcome showers. The season officially began June 1 and runs until November 30. However, no one told that to Alex and Bonnie – the former developed in January and the latter in May. With five named storms gone, around 10 more are likely.

Uncertainty

The skill in forecasting the hurricane season in August is quite high – up to 50% better than guessing or using the average activity of a season as the forecast, which would be correct around 33% of the time. This translates to the August forecast being right around 83% of the time.

Notwithstanding the high skill, there is and always will be some level of uncertainty. It is still uncertain as to if and when will La Nina (cooler than usual Pacific Ocean) develop. Also, there are uncertainties regarding it strength, if it does develop. A strong La Nina during August to November could result in an active/above normal season as opposed to a near normal one. NOAA has put the probability of an active season at 35% and the probability of a near normal one at 50%.

Probability of Antigua and Barbuda being hit

According to Klotzbach, the likely best similar years to this hurricane season are 1958, 1959, 1966, 1978, 1992 and 1998. Of these years, six named storms passed within 121 miles of Antigua; of them, there were three hurricanes and one tropical storm that hit the island. Of them, Major Hurricane Georges of 1998 is the most notable. Thus, based ONLY on similar years, probabilistically Antigua has a

  • 63% chance of being affected by one or more named storms (passing within 121 miles), usually it’s 62%;
  • 49% chance of being hit by one or more named storms (passing within 17 to 75 miles), usually it’s 49% and
  • 39% chance of being hit by one or more hurricanes (passing within 17 miles), usually its 31%.

 Barbuda’s numbers, based on five named storms passing within 75 miles:

  • 57% chance of being affected by one or more named storms (normally it’s 52%);
  • 57% chance of being hit by one or more named storms (normally it’s 32%) and
  • 39% chance of being hit by one or more hurricanes (normally it’s 23%).

The hit forecast probabilities for Barbuda are significantly higher than usual. The numbers suggest that Barbuda is more likely than not to be hit by a named storm. The other forecast probabilities are similar to what is usual. However, it must be noted that our usual numbers are generally higher than most places.

Become hurricane strong

Notwithstanding the forecast, active or inactive season, it only takes one hurricane to turn your life upside-down, so the same comprehensive preparations are required to mitigate or reduce the impacts a tropical cyclone. Take actions today and become hurricane strong/resilient. Actions include:

  • Determining your risk from tropical cyclones;
  • Developing an evacuation plan;
  • Securing an insurance check-up;
  • Assembling disaster supplies;
  • Strengthening your home;
  • Identifying trusted sources of information for a hurricane event and
  • Having your written hurricane plan.

Recall – an ounce of prevention is better than pound of cure!

A summary of the hurricane season will be available by December. Follow us via our social media platform and stay updated on the current hurricane season. We are available on twitter, facebook, wordpress, instagram, tumblr, and google+. Follow us also for all things weather and climate.








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