Extreme Winds and Seas to Usher in the New Year

28 12 2020

Dale C. S. Destin |

Extreme wind and marine events are forecast for this week across the northeast Caribbean, including Antigua and Barbuda. The howling wind event will take place Thursday – NEW YEAR’S EVE, through Saturday – January 2, whereas the life-threatening marine event will take place New Year’s Eve night through Sunday – January 3. Warnings and advisories for strong winds, rough seas and high surfs will be required for most islands.

Northeast Caribbean: Estimated max 3-second gusts; max sustained 10-minute winds; average of the top 10% of significant wave heights and average of top 10% of swells

The angry winds and seas could cause notable socio-economic impacts to the islands. Similar actions by nature, earlier this year, caused ships to turn away from Antigua and Barbuda and cancelled ferry services. There were also reports of LIAT aborting landings in some islands; banana trees being downed in some countries and power outage in some areas.

The kick-off of these unwelcome but not unusual events is expected on Thursday. The pressure gradient will rapidly and significantly steepen, which will become evident by the closeness of the isobars – lines of equal pressure, on our weather maps. The closer the isobars, the steeper the pressure gradient, the stronger the winds and vice versa.

Gale-force gusts, the equivalent to tropical storm-force gusts, are likely – gusts exceeding 78 km/h (over 48 mph). Otherwise, the winds will frequently be above 40 km/h (over 25 mph). The maximum sustained 10-minute wind speeds will likely reach around 50 km/h (31 mph), whereas the maximum sustained 1-minute winds will reach around 56 km/h (35 mph). The strongest winds are forecast for New Year’s Day, especially across open waters, windward coastal areas and elevated places. The prevailing wind direction will be northeast.

Visualization of wind gusts (shaded) wind direction (short solid lines) and isobars (long solid lines with numbers – pressure in millibars) – December 31 2020 to January 4 2021

As the winds go, so go the seas. The tumultuous winds will cause the seas to rise and become extremely threatening – very rough in open waters on Thursday through Sunday. Significant wave heights could peak at or above 4 metres (over 13 feet), locally exceeding 5 metres (near 17 feet). The highest seas are also expected on New Year’s Day. These seas will be non-navigational for small craft and even some non-small-craft operators.

Significant wave heights according to the ECMWF WAM Model – December 31 2020 to January 5 2021

High swells and surfs (breaking waves) are also forecast for Sunday. Swells in excess of 2.5 metres (over 8 feet) and surfs in excess of 3 metres (over 10 feet) are likely. These breaking waves will make for very dangerous conditions for beachgoers and others using the coastlines.

The events will make for a high threat to the life and livelihood and property and infrastructure of mariners and users of the nearshore areas. There is also the potential for extensive impacts including the following:

  • Loss of life
  • Injuries
  • Damage or loss of boats and fishing equipment
  • Saltwater intrusion and disruptions to potable water from desalination
  • Coastal flooding from sea water splashing onto low lying coastal roads
  • Sea search and rescue disruptions
  • Cancellations to transportation (especially by sea)
  • Scarcity of sea food
  • Disruption or cancellation to sporting and recreation events (especially marine activities)
  • Businesses and economic losses

To be safe, mariners should stay in or near port and beachgoers should stay out of the waters for affected coastlines. Also, residents should secure light and loose objects, which can be blown away, and caution should be taken when driving. The anticipated blustery winds could make some outdoor activities uncomfortable, if not outright dangerous. These winds can also create dangerous fallen or blowing objects.

The turbulent winds will unsettle the atmosphere, resulting in brief heavy showers. However, rainfall accumulations will only be of minimal concern, at most.

These events will affect virtually the entire Caribbean Basin, at different times. They will start across the Bahamas and the Western Caribbean on Tuesday and reach the northeast Caribbean on Thursday. Then, they will spread across the southern Caribbean by Friday – New Year’s Day. The extreme events will come to an end by Sunday, January 3, 2021, although seas will likely still be hazardous for some areas, beyond Sunday.

At times, it may feel like there is a tropical storm in the area, but I can ashore you that there is none. The hurricane season remains over.

Check and monitor your local forecasts, from your national weather service, for details specific to your location. This is a relatively broad scale view; hence, the numbers WILL change either way.

Please continue to follow me for more on these extreme events and all things weather and climate via TwitterFacebook and Instagram. Also, share this blog, if you found it useful.





Strong Howling Winds to Continue to Impact the Caribbean

11 01 2020

Dale C.S. Destin, updated January 12, 2020 |

Strong howling winds are expected to continue across much of the Caribbean Basin through Tuesday. These huffing and puffing, big bad wolf winds are causing notable socio-economic impacts to the islands.

As the winds go up, so also do the seas; hence, hazardous seas have engulfed the region – from the Bahamas to the Guyanas, including the Caribbean Sea.

The winds have risen to the range of 29 to 52 km/h or (18 to 32 mph) over land and are expected to persist until Tuesday. Further, gusts as high as 80 km/h (50 mph) are possible for some areas. Over the Caribbean Sea, the winds are forecast to be stronger than some places over land. One such area is between Jamaica and Columbia, where sustained winds – 70 km/h (44 mph), are forecast. With respect to land, the highest sustained winds are forecast for the Eastern Caribbean.

The blustery winds will cause the seas to remain very angry with significant wave heights of 2.5 to over 4 metres (8 to 14 feet) and occasionally reaching over 5 metres (18 feet). There is an area between Jamaica and Columbia where the significant wave heights are predicted to be over 5 metres (18 feet), occasionally reaching 7 metres (23 feet).

Over the past 24 hours, above normal swells, from distant strong winds, have added to the hazards across the area. So, not only there are concerns for high winds and hazardous marine conditions in open waters, there is now also a concern for the impact of life-threatening surfs (breaking waves) along, mainly northern and north-facing shorelines; hence, a high surf advisory has or will be required for most islands. Already, a high surf advisory is in effect for much of the Caribbean.

Beachgoers should be extremely cautious; bathe only where lifeguards are present or the sheltered, less affected beaches, mainly to the south. See the bulletins from your national weater service for detail and specific guidance for you local.

Such conditions are very conducive fo rip currents – powerful channels of water flowing quickly away from shore, which occur most often at low spots or breaks in the sandbar and near structures such as groins, jetties and piers. If caught in a rip current, relax and float. Don`t swim against the current. If able, swim in a direction following the shoreline. If unable to escape, face the shore and call or wave for help.

As a result of the weather, more so the strong winds, three cruise ships had to abort berthing at the St. John’s Harbour in Antigua. These, I am informed, were The Anthem of the Seas, Norwegian Dawn and Crown Princess. Ferry service between Antigua and Montserrat has been cancelled until Thursday. The have also been aborted attempts by LIAT to land in Dominica. There are also reports of downed banana and other trees in the Windward Islands and Trinidad and Tobago, and there have been power outage in the British Virgin Islands and Trinidad and Tobago attributed to the strong winds.

Thus far, the highest winds (10-minute sustained and gusts) have been observed at:

  • Grantley Adams International Airport (GAIA), Barbados;
  • George F.L. Charles Airport (GFLCA), St Lucia and
  • Norman Manley International Airport, Jamaica.
The winds by the numbers. One mph = 1.61 km/h. Multiply 10-minute sustaned winds by 1.11 and 1.40 to get 1-minute sustained winds and 3 second gusts respectively. *Harper et al. 2010 is the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) standard.

Looking at the winds by the numbers. Speeds of 39 mph or more are storm-force or gale-force winds, gusts in this case. However, when dealing with tropical cyclones, categorization is based on a maximum 1-minute sustaned wind speed. To convert from 10-minute wind speeds to 1-minute wind speeds, multiply by 1.11. Thus, parts of Barbados, Jamaica and St. Lucia had sustained storm-force windsstorm conditions (35×1.11 = 39 mph or 63 km/h). However, note that there are no tropical cyclones in the area.

Winds blow because of the differential of pressure across the Earth’s surface. The higher the horizontal differential or the higher the pressure gradient, the stronger the winds. The strong winds, over the next several days, will continue to be due to a very steep pressure gradient. The pressure will be that steep largely due to a 1042 millibar high-pressure system moving off the US east coast.

Pressure pattern forecast for 2 am Saturday, January 11, 2020
The ususal pressure pattern across the North Atlantic for January. Note that the usual difference of pressure between Bermuda High and the Caribbean is around 6 to 8 mb.

Immediately above is the usual pressure pattern for the North Atlantic. Note that the usual difference in pressure between the Bermuda High and the Caribbean is around 6 to 8 millibars. However, compare the graphic below to the one above and you will observed that the difference in pressure between the Bermuda High and the Caribbean (at 2 am, Sat, 11 Jan 2020) was 20 to 24 millibars. Thus, the pressure difference and gradient were two to four times higher that usual or 200 to 400% of normal; hence, the very strong winds.

North Atlantiuc surface chart – 2 am, Saturday, 11 January 2020

The highest and most dangerous waves will take place across the waters of the western Caribbean – between Jamaica and Columbia. This area will also experience the strongest winds – 51 to 64 km/h (32 to 40 mph), gale-force/storm-force winds, with gusts in excess of 96 km/h (60 mph).

Advisories and or warnings to mariners have been issued by a number of islands, including Antigua and Barbuda, Puerto Rico and Barbados.

As a small craft operator, if an advisory is issued – inexperienced mariners, especially those operating smaller vessels should avoid navigating in these conditions. If a small craft warning is issued – you should stay in or very near port.

Potential impacts from this hazardous sea event include injuries or loss of life, damage or loss of boats and fishing equipment and disruption to sea transportation. Other possible impacts comprise of:

  • disruptions to sea search and rescue;
  • scarcity of seafood;
  • disruptions to off shore marine recreation and businesses;
  • business and economic losses.

On the other hand, the strong winds could result in further disruptions to transportation and outdoor sporting activities, soil erosion, vehicular accidents and financial losses.

Please share my blog, if you find it useful and keep following it and my other media – TwitterFacebook and Instagram for more on this windy issue and all things weather and climate.





Strong Winds and Hazardous Seas to Impact Parts of the Caribbean

22 01 2019

As the winds go, so go the seas. As the winds go up the seas will go up and become hazardous across the Bahamas, Cuba and Jamaica, in the western Caribbean, to around Anguilla in the northern Leeward Islands.

Hazardous Seas – Credit UCAR

The winds and wind waves have already started to pick up across the islands mentioned above, particularly the western Caribbean. The winds will eventually get to the range of 34 to 53 kmh (21 to 33 mph) through Thursday. Consequently, seas will become hazardous with wind waves of 2.5 to 3.5 metres (8 to 12 ft), occasionally reaching 4.5 metres (15 ft).

The highest and most dangerous waves will take place across the waters of the western Caribbean, where the winds will be the strongest. Outside of the islands listed above, including Antigua and Barbuda, the wind waves will unlikely reach 2.5 metres (8 ft), as the winds are not expected to get sufficiently high.

Advisories and or warnings to mariners, particularly small craft operators, will be required and already Puerto Rico and the Cayman Islands have issued such.

As a small craft operator, if an advisory is issued – inexperienced mariners, especially those operating smaller vessels should avoid navigating in these conditions. If a small craft warning is issued – you should stay in or very near port.

Potential impacts from this hazardous sea event include injuries or loss of life, damage or loss of boats and fishing equipment and disruption to sea transportation. Other possible impacts comprise of:

  • disruptions to sea search and rescue;
  • scarcity of seafood;
  • disruptions to off shore marine recreation and businesses;
  • business and economic losses.

On the other hand, the strong winds could result in disruptions to air transportation and outdoor sporting activities, soil erosion, vehicular accidents and financial losses.

As the winds go, so goes the seas; however, as the pressure gradient goes so go the winds. The winds will become strong because the pressure gradient will become quite tight across the northern islands. Think of pressure gradient like a hill and the wind as a car. The steeper the hill the faster the car will roll down the hill and vice versa.


Surface Chart for 2 pm (18 UTC) Today. Note the Seven Relatively Close Isobars (Black Lines) on the Left (Western Caribbean) Compared with the Four Widely Spaced one on the Right (Eastern Caribbean). The Pressure Gradient and Winds are Much Higher across the West than the East.

Note, unlike the blog from yesterday that spoke about swell waves, this blog is focusing on wind waves. What is the difference? Swells are waves generated by distant winds and are of danger primarily to users of the near shore, beaches and coastlines. On the other hand, wind waves are locally generated and are mainly of danger to mariners using off shore waters.

The strong winds and hazardous seas will subside to relatively safe levels by late Friday. Keep following my blog and other media – TwitterFacebook and Instagram for more on this event and all things weather and climate.





Steep Pressure Gradient to Cause Hazardous Conditions Across the Region

27 12 2018

Dale C. S. Destin|

Strong and gusty winds are forecast to move across most of the Caribbean this weekend – Friday through Sunday. These winds will make for hazardous conditions onshore and especially offshore. Some activities on land will become dangerous and marine conditions will be very hazardous for small craft operators.

The high winds and seas may be reminiscent of the passage of a weak tropical storm, but they won’t be due to any such system. The elevated winds will be the result of a very steep pressure gradient, due to the strength and location of the centre of a high-pressure system. The pressure gradient – the horizontal change of pressure, will be around 25% higher than normal.

Very hazardous seas in excess of 2.5 metres and rising to 3.5 metres (9 to 12 feet) will take place Friday through Sunday across the northeast Caribbean. Winds and seas will start building on Thursday – peaking on Saturday. Seas will occasionally reach 4.5 metres (15 feet).

These hazardous conditions will peak about a day earlier across the western Caribbean (including the Bahamas) and a day later across the southern Caribbean.

The winds will range between 34 and 45 km/h (21 and 32 mph) across the northeast Caribbean Friday through Sunday. Gusts to gale-force i.e. 64 km/h (40 mph) are expected. These kinds of winds very unusual for the region outside of being associated with a tropical cyclone (hurricane, tropical storm or tropical depression). The wind will generally blow from the east.

Possible impacts of the strong winds and hazardous seas include:

  • injuries or loss of life;
  • damage or loss of boats and fishing equipment;
  • disruptions to marine recreation and businesses;
  • disruptions to air and especially sea transportation;
  • disruptions to outdoor sporting activities;
  • disruptions of sea search and rescue;
  • scarcity of sea food;
  • vehicular accidents and
  • economic losses.

The worst affected area is likely to be the northern Caribbean – including the Leeward Islands and areas further west. Marine warnings are expected to be issued by most islands. Winds will be strongest over open waters, elevated terrains and windward coastal areas – eastern coastal areas.

Small craft operators and even some not so small crafts operators should stay in or very near port this weekend. Work at high and exposed evaluations should be avoided. Some outdoor activities may need to be postponed or adjusted for the conditions. Secure or take indoors light and loose objects – patio furniture, trash can etc..

Be very caution if you need to drive a high-profile vehicle, as strong winds could make for difficult, if not dangerous, driving of such automobile.

This event is not related to a tropical cyclone; nonetheless, some measures need to be put in place to mitigate the potential impacts – especially those related to the marine environment.

Please feel free to share my blog, if you find it interesting, and follow us for all things weather and climate. 





Windy Weather to Cause More Hazardous Seas and Economic Losses

8 01 2018

Dale C. S. Destin |

Hazardous seas being caused by frequently strong winds – gusting to near gale force at times, will continue to keep most mariners in or near port over the upcoming week – causing further significant economic losses for many.

Seas around Antigua and Barbuda have been rough for most of the year, so far, and are set to remain that way or even worsen over the next seven days, at least. As usual, this type of weather is very disruptive to marine activities and have a negative economic impact, particularly on fisherfolk, those alone the fisheries value-chain and those involve in offshore pleasure cruises and adventures.

Small craft warning remains in effect for hazardous seas around Antigua and Barbuda and will likely remain in place for the rest of the week. Hence, small craft operators, especially inexperienced ones, should avoid navigating in these conditions.

Warnings are also in effect for beach-goers as high surfs are affecting beaches, producing beach erosion and dangerous swimming conditions. Beach-goers should avoid the waters, especially those on the northern and eastern side of the islands. These high surfs are likely to subside to more manageable levels by Tuesday.

High surfs can also cause strong rip currents, which can carry even the strongest swimmers out to sea, and seawater splashing onto low-lying coastal roads, causing damage. Further, high surfs can also knock spectators off exposed rocks and jetties. Breaking waves may also occasionally impact harbours making navigating the harbour channel dangerous.

The wind speed will range between 14 and 22 knots (16 to 25 mph) and at times gusting to near 30 knots (35 mph). The winds will be strongest on Tuesday and Friday and will blow from near east for most of the week.

Wind speed – valid at 6 am, Tue, Jan 9, 2018

Seas will remain hazardous with steep waves ranging between 2 and 3 metres (7 and 10 ft), occasionally reaching near 4 metres (13 ft), mainly in open waters on the eastern or windward side of the islands.

Significant wave height (ft) – valid at 6 am, Tue, Jan 9, 2018

These strong winds not only cause hazardous seas but also cause certain onshore activities to be uncomfortable, if not dangerous. Hence, certain outdoor work will be hampered, if not halted, at times; thus, reducing productivity in other sectors.

The windy conditions and hazardous seas will also be experienced by all the islands of the Eastern Caribbean along with Hispaniola and the Bahamas, particularly the Atlantic coastal waters or the eastern and northern coastal waters.

The strong winds are not due to any storm system but rather because of steep pressure gradients across the area. Recall that winds blow due to pressure differences or pressure gradients, and the greater the gradients the stronger the winds and vice versa.

Also, the strength and position of the ever-present subtropical/Atlantic high-pressure system modulate the steepness of the pressure gradient. The closer and or stronger the subtropical high, the steeper the gradient, the stronger the winds and vice versa.

The subtropical high-pressure system will be stronger than normal for much of the next week; hence, the forecast continuation of strong winds, hazardous seas, disrupted marine activities and economic losses.

Although windy, the weather will be mostly dry with only occasional brief showers likely.

Follow us for all you need to know about this windy weather and all things weather and climate. We can be followed on twitterfacebookinstagramtumblrflickrgoogle+, and youtube.





Very Hazardous Marine Conditions for Antigua and Barbuda

14 01 2017

Dale C. S. Destin |

 

High Surf

High Surf

The shoreline Antigua and Barbuda and the rest of the northeast Caribbean are getting hammered by high surfs. Additionally, starting today, seas in open waters will become very unfriendly to small craft operators. As a result, the weather authority in Antigua and Barbuda has issued special marine statements on the high surfs and rough seas.

Surfs are building – they are expected to range 8-12 feet (2.4-3.6 m) between today and Monday, affecting mainly northern and eastern coastlines. These high surfs are being generated by a low pressure system located just northeast of the area, which is pushing very large swells to our shores.

There is a high risk of rip currents, especially over the next 24 hours when the surfs are expected to peak. Rip currents are powerful channels of water flowing quickly away from shore, which occur most often at low spots or breaks in the sandbar and in the vicinity of structures such as groins such as jetties and piers.

The winds will become fresh to strongthey will frequently be in excess of 18 mph (16 knots) from today to Wednesday. The winds will peak at around 30 mph (22 knots) with occasional gale-force gusts to the around 39 mph (34 knots) today and Sunday likely.  These winds will primarily take place over open waters, coastal areas on the northern and eastern side of the islands and elevated areas.

windjan142017

windgustsjan142017

The seas will respond to the winds – they will become very rough, rising to as high as 3.6 metres (12 feet) on Saturday night Sunday. Waves will decrease to less than 2.0 metres (6 feet) by Wednesday.

seasjan142017

The cause of the strong winds – this is due to a significantly tight of the pressure gradient (horizontal differential of pressure) across, which will tighten a bit more over the next 24 hours. The relatively tight pressure gradient is in response to a strong high pressure system moving from west to east across the Atlantic from the United States. There are NO tropical cyclone (tropical depression, tropical storm or hurricane) in the area.

Surface Chart

Surface Chart for Saturday 8 am, Showing a Tight Pressure a Tight Gradient as Evident by the Closeness of the Isobar (Pressure Lines)

Precautions – Sea-bathers should avoid the waters, mainly on the northern and eastern sides of the islands until Tuesday. Small craft operators should not venture far from port through Monday.

A high surf warning means that high surf will affect beaches in the advisory area, producing beach erosion and dangerous swimming conditions.

A small craft advisory means that wind speeds of 24-38 mph (21 to 33 kt) and or seas of 7 feet (2.1 m) or greater are expected to produce hazardous wave conditions to small craft. Inexperienced mariners, especially those operating smaller vessels should avoid navigating in these conditions.

The strong winds, especially if frequently gusting to gale force, could also make some outdoor activities very uncomfortable if not hazardous, please be guided accordingly.

Stay updated on the situation by following us via our social media platform:  twitter,  facebook,  instagramtumblrflickrgoogle+, and youtube.





Easter to See More Hazardous Marine Weather Across Most of the Caribbean

26 03 2016

Dale C. S. Destin |

Fresh to strong gusty winds are causing hazardous seas across most of the Caribbean. This is expected to continue beyond Easter Monday (March 28).

Credit UCAR

Hazardous seas; Credit UCAR

Based on observations from met. offices and weather buoys, the winds were in the range of 15 to 22 knots (17-25 mph) with gusts in excess of 32 knots (37 mph).

In some areas, the winds were much stronger. At the Norman Manley International Airport, Jamaica, peak sustained winds of 26 knots (30 mph) were measured. No doubt parts of that island had gusts in excess of 34 knots (39 mph) – the equivalent to gale force or tropical storm force winds.

Weather report

Weather report from Norman Manley Int’l Airport – Mar 25, 2016, 2 pm local time

Winds were strongest across the Caribbean Sea, south of Jamaica. Today, Buoy 42058 measured winds in the range of 21 to 25 knots (24-29 mph) with gusts reaching 32 knots (37 mph).

Buoy data show the Caribbean Sea, especially south of Jamaica, is basically impassable by boat due to tremendously hazardous seas reaching as high as 4 metres (13 feet). Across the waters Eastern Caribbean, seas are near 2.5 metres (8 feet) and building.

Buoy data for March 25, 2016

Buoy data, seas for Mar 22-26, 2016 GMT/UTC

Buoy Data

Buoy data, wind speed Mar 22-26, 2016 GMT/UTC

The strong winds are in response to the high pressure gradient across the region. Winds blow as a result of differential pressure. The greater this differential is i.e. higher the pressure gradient, the stronger the winds and vice versa.

Surface chart depicting high pressure gradient evident by the closeness of the isobars (black lines)

Surface chart depicting high pressure gradient evident by the closeness and high quantity of the isobars (black lines)

As the winds increase, the friction on the underlying sea surface results in building seas or wind-driven waves. The stronger the winds, the higher the wind-driven waves and vice versa.

A further increase in the pressure gradient is forecast over the next 24 hours. Hence, winds and seas are expected to get higher. Thus, marine conditions are expected to become even more treacherous tomorrow.

Seas could exceed 4.5 metres (15 feet) across the waters between Jamaica and Panama. Meanwhile seas and could exceed 2.7 metres (9 feet) mainly on the Atlantic (east) side of Barbuda, Antigua, Guadeloupe, Dominica and Martinique.

Forecast Seas

Forecast Seas (feet), valid 2 pm (1800 UTC), Sat, March 26, 2016

The winds could increase by another 2 to 5 knots (2-6 mph) with gusts in the upper 20s to lower 40s knots ( upper 20s to upper 40s mph).

Forecast Winds

Forecast Winds (knots), valid around 11 am (1500 UTC) Sat, Mar 26, 2016

Forecast Gusts

Forecast Gusts (knots), valid around 11 am Sat, Mar 26, 2016

Clearly, it goes without saying that mariners should not venture far from port and sea-bathers should be extremely careful. As a matter of fact, sea-bathers should avoid the beaches on the northern and eastern sides of the islands. For Hispaniola and Jamaica, beach-goers should also avoid the waters on the southern side of those islands.

The strong winds could also make some outdoor activities very uncomfortable to perform, if not outright dangerous. This is especially true of work at elevations. Please be guided accordingly.

The winds will start to subside on Sunday. However, seas will not return to safe levels until around Wednesday.

Cuba is the only Island being spared by the strong winds and hazardous seas.

We will keep you updated via our social media platform, which includes twitter, facebook, wordpress, instagram, tumblr, and google+. You are invited to follow for all things weather and climate.





Needed Showers but Unwelcome Hazardous Seas for Much of the Caribbean

7 03 2016

Dale C. S. Destin |

A cold front is sweeping the Caribbean, bringing much-needed showers but unwelcome strong winds and hazardous seas.

Rainfall

Already, more than an inch of rain has fallen in parts of Cuba and Hispaniola over the past 72 hours. Meanwhile, winds have reached near 20 knots (23 mph) with stronger gusts across Cuba. Seas are near 3 m (10 ft.) and rising, mainly across the northern waters of the Bahamas.

The front is expected to reach Trinidad by around Thursday/Friday, which is very unusual for such a system to go so far south into the Caribbean.

As it moves across the region, showers will spread to the Virgin Islands today; the Leeward Islands late Tuesday/Wednesday; the Windward Islands and Barbados Wednesday/Thursday and Trinidad and Tobago Thursday/Friday.

Most of these islands will likely see rainfall totals in the range of 10-40 mm (0.40-1.60 in). At least minor inland flooding is possible across some islands.

FcastRain

Forecast 5-Day Rainfall Total for the Period March 7-11, 2016

Strong winds and rough seas will reach the various islands within 24 hours after the arrival of the front and continuing for up to 120 hours after the front passes. Thus, by Friday, most of the waters of the Caribbean will be having hazardous seas and will require the requisite warnings for mariners and sea bathers. Seas could peak near 3.5 m (12 ft.) across some areas.

Seas.png

Most areas will see sustained winds in excess of 20 knots (23 mph) with gusts across a few islands reaching gale force strength of near 40 knots (46 mph). Higher elevations can expect higher speeds.

WindGusts.png

With the combination of strong winds, sea swells and wind-driven waves, flooding of low-lying coastal areas due to large breaking waves is possible. Damage to coastlines can also be expected.

The strong winds could also render some routine outdoor activities uncomfortable if not hazardous.

We will continue to follow the progress of this system and keep you posted. Meanwhile, pay attentions forecast coming from your local meteorological office for information specific to you location.





Hold on to Your Hats and Skirts!

31 12 2014

Dale C. S. Destin |

Forecast Wind Speeds - Sun Jan 4, 2015

Forecast Wind Speed – Sun Jan 4, 2015

Hold on to your hats and skirts and batten down the hatches. Strong winds and very rough seas to kick off the new year across Antigua and much of the Caribbean.

The winds will become stronger with peak sustained speed near 25 mph (22 knots) over the weekend across Antigua and Barbuda. The winds will also be very gusty with gusts as high as 37 mph (32 knots) possible, just 2 mph short of storm force.

Forecast Wind Gust - Sun Jan 4, 2015

Forecast Wind Gust – Sun Jan 4, 2015

The strong winds will stirrup very rough seas in our area. Seas could peak as high as 3.6 metres (12 ft) Sunday and continue above 2.4 metres (8 ft) until, at least, the middle of next week. By next Thursday there could be a transition from wind waves to swell waves from a frontal low pressure system.

Forecast Wave Height - Sun Jan 4, 2015

Forecast Wave Height – Sun Jan 4, 2015

The strong winds are in response to the steepening of the pressure gradient across the area. You may recall that winds are the horizontal movement of air. They only occur due to the spatial deferential in atmospheric pressure. The change in pressure across a particular area is called the pressure gradient. The steeper the gradient or greater the pressure difference between two points, the stronger the winds and vice versa.

Warnings are already in effect for hazardous seas that are bound to get much worse. Mariners should consider staying near shore until winds and seas subside, perhaps late next week.

The strong winds could make certain activities uncomfortable, if not dangerous. For example, working at elevation could be dangerous and should be curtailed until the winds return to normal speeds.

The worst conditions will be seen in the western Caribbean Seas, juts north of Columbia. The winds are expected to peak near 44 mph (38 knots) with gusts near 54 mph (47 knots); this is tropical storm strength and under tropical cyclone criteria would require a tropical storm warning. Wave heights will approach 6 metres (20 ft).

This area of storm force winds is pushing large waves outward which will cause most of the Caribbean Sea to be rough for the next several days. Mariners should avoid travelling not only the Atlantic waters of the Caribbean but also the Caribbean Sea, especially the western Caribbean Sea south of Jamaica.

Feel free to share with us your experiences of this strong wind and very rough seas event and follow us on wordpress: 268weather.wordpress.com twitter: @anumetservice facebook: /anumetservice tumblr: anumetservice.tumblr.com to keep current with weather and climate info.

Happy New Year!








%d bloggers like this: